Car Craft
Click here to find out more!

1967 Chevrolet Camaro - The Lost Z/28

How Ignorance And Blind Luck Contributed To The Deal Of A Lifetime

By , Photography by , Wes AlIison

The Z/28 Option

The whole reason the Z/28 was created was to compete with the Fords and Mopars in the SCCA Trans-Am series. The over 2.0L class limited displacement to 5.0 liters, or 305 ci. Since Chevy didn't have a 5.0L engine, it responded in classic car crafter fashion by building a 302ci engine using a small-journal 327 4.00-inch-bore block and a forged-steel 3.00-inch-stroke 283 crankshaft. The cam was the classic Duntov 30-30 mechanical lifter camshaft along with a set of 462 iron 2.02/1.60-inch valve heads, an aluminum dual-plane intake manifold, and a Holley carburetor.

Since this was a road race car, Chevy bolted on a set of RPO J52 four-piston disc brake calipers and then specified a set of 15 x 6-inch Rally wheels mounted with 7.35 x 15-inch tires. A Muncie four-speed was the only transmission available (close ratio was standard, wide ratio was optional) along with a standard 3.73:1 rear gear and a factory-installed traction bar. This was back in the day when you could also get as deep as a 4.88:1 gear straight off the factory order form. The minimal Z/28 package in 1967 was the engine, four-speed, a 3.73:1-geared 12-bolt, and power disc brakes. Other options such as the RS package, headers, cowl induction, an air cleaner, a vinyl top, the spoiler package, and tach and gauges were available. My car did have a few options, including a tinted windshield, a console, and Positraction, along with a radio and a heater.

Everyone knows there were only 602 of these cars built in 1967. What I've never uncovered (not that I've looked very hard) is the number of Z/28s delivered for sale with the California emissions package. This has to reduce the number down to perhaps a few dozen at most.

Enjoyed this Post? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, or use your favorite social media to recommend us to friends and colleagues!
2 comments
Dana R Reynolds
Dana R Reynolds

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story back in the (early?) 80s when you (first?) told it and it was great to read it again! Maybe you could work with your sister magazine, Musclecar Classics, and do some restoration articles on it.

2002Z28
2002Z28

Great story  is the car still yours now ? and is it restored  you should please do a fallow up story 

Car Craft