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1963 Shelby Cobra at Auctions America

The two-seater comes stuffed with a 289ci, four-speed, and factory four-wheel disc brakes

This 1963 Shelby Cobra is no ordinary two-seater sports car. It comes with a long list of documentation dating back to when it was billed to Shelby American on October 1, 1962 and sold to Downtown Ford in Los Angeles on November 28, 1962. The paper trail picks up from 1971 until 2011 when the Cobra was owned by Ruben Garnica. The Shelby then underwent an initial restoration in the early 1980s and a recent restoration to ensure top-notch, show quality.

That said, Auctions America returns to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, for its twelfth year at the Greater Fort Lauderdale/Broward County Convention Center. The auction, which plans to feature 450 American and European sports cars, Detroit muscle, hot rods and custom-builds, will take place March 14-16, 2014. The highlight of the weekend’s event will be this pristine 1963 Shelby Cobra.

Auctions America will auction this 1963 Shelby Cobra, chassis number CSX2023, stuffed with a 289ci small-block topped with a period correct carburetor that feeds into an S1 intake. The Cobra’s valve covers let people know it’s the real-deal with period correct, hollowed out lettering displaying the brand name. Power is harnessed by a four-speed manual transmission with original style shifter.

Doing the stopping at all four corners of the Cobra are factory four-wheel disc brakes hidden behind chrome wire wheels wrapped in Goodyear Power Cushion whitewall tires. Under the car, bidders will find a period-correct, dual exhaust system. On the interior, leather upholstered seats seat the driver and passenger comfortably, while Ray Brown three-inch lap belts keep them safe and snug. An original Smiths clock joins the factory gauges that give this car its museum-quality detail. A Motolita steering wheel rounds out the dash. Covering the occupants of the Cobra is a soft-top with side curtains; the entire car is dripping with a gorgeous coat of Silver Moss poly paint.

This AC-style Shelby Cobra was always a celebrated workhorse of SCCA racing circuit, as well as European FIA championships in the 1960s. It is surely the desired piece of any collector’s collection and will fetch a fair price at Auctions America in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, come March 14-16, 2014. Feel free to visit the Auctions America website for more information about this car, and to also watch the live stream of the auction HERE.

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26 comments
Flavio Leon
Flavio Leon

289 solid lifters...OWN the sound dept!!

Brandon Gravitt
Brandon Gravitt

rare shmare the point of the hobby is taking a car and making it your own.

Roger Perry
Roger Perry

28 years serving the city of Newark Delaware , Newark main street , Newark Delaware , by the university of Delaware

Chuck Irwin
Chuck Irwin

I'm torn on that, I want my car to be some what original, but I'm not against improvements that don't take away from that much.

Giovanni De Cicco
Giovanni De Cicco

Some cars you cut up and improve, some you leave alone and enjoy what made them classics from the get go.

Jay Gribbin
Jay Gribbin

If you want an appreciating asset, have an unmodified original. If you want a good drivers car, build a replica and put modern suspension and mechanicals under it.

John Lyons
John Lyons

Depends on how rare the car is and weather it has historical value as original or not.

Chris Weideman
Chris Weideman

Change up the engine if you want but keep the body original.

Scott Miller
Scott Miller

I was lucky enough to be taken for a ride in a 289 Cobra in the mid 1980's. We achieved 80 miles an hour in 2nd gear in a very short distance. So no need to modify such a valuable car.

Trevor Flus
Trevor Flus

I like to see cobras original as they are tuned from new, some muscle cars weren't fast enough from factory but had all the looks/interchangability to be great hot rods. Im building a 468 grand national. The best looking g body with lots of collectability but needed a big block for my taste.

Todd Neer
Todd Neer

We're to a point n the hobby where what's left of original hi-po or particularly rare cars need to be preserved as best possible, but run of the mill cars can be taken to the limit, we need to be responsible, if you want a "G-machine" n own a SS454 W matching numbers, sell it, buy a Malibu n go ta town on it,

Tobias Montoya
Tobias Montoya

I'd customize the block by adding fuel injection , roller cam / rockers . Center fragile supper chargers and a new crank but I'd work the original head's. So custom but not completely yes definitely .

Jonathan P. Conde
Jonathan P. Conde

depends on the vehicle, my 91 Z28 the sky is the limit or my 67 Galaxie, as far as modifying or customizing. Now my 64 Impala SS 409, 4 speed car. NO Way would I change it from original....

Luis Matías
Luis Matías

Cars and virgins they are originals only once.

Hans-Jörg Ramforth
Hans-Jörg Ramforth

classic, the value (esp. matching numbers) rises the value more than custom car. regards from Germany

Paul R Castro
Paul R Castro

depends on the vin. classic with a 6 cyl, obviously change it. rare original numbers matching, leave it be.

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