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Ford Engineers all-new EcoBoost Race Engine

Michael Shank Racing will Debut the 3.5-liter V6 at the 2014 Rolex 24 at Daytona

Ford is proud to have a new engine that will hit race tracks worldwide. Called the EcoBoost, the 3.5-liter V6 will debut at the Daytona International Speedway during the “World Center of Speed” Oct. 9, 2013. Michael Shank Racing, with Colin Braun behind the wheel, will be the first team to power a car with the all-new race engine.

With Colin Braun behind the wheel, the Michael Shank Racing team will attempt a record run speed test at Daytona International Speedway Oct. 9. The “World Center of Speed” had its last record of 210.364 mph lap laid down Feb. 9, 1987, by NASCAR champion Bill Elliott. The Nicoghosian designed car will take the track October 8, weather permitting, at 8 a.m. to start building up speed for the record attempt.

“It’s really a privilege to have an opportunity to put your name in the record books like this,” Mike Shank, the team owner, said. “It is almost inconceivable that this record has stood for such a long time, so it’s pretty special to be involved. We worked a long time to develop our relationship with Ford to be in a position to take on projects like this. Anytime you can get in the record books, it is a great opportunity and just builds on what this company has done.”

The EcoBoost engine is set to race in an exclusive 2014 Riley Technologies Daytona Prototype car. The designed body features a new look with Ford production cues and aerodynamic support. The car will be set to race in the upcoming 2014 TUDOR United SportsCar Championship. Designed by lead Ford production designer Garen Nicoghosian and from Ford Racing chief aerodynamicist Bernie Marcus, this car is sure to give the EcoBoost that extra speed necessary to win.

“At Ford Racing, we really put great emphasis on racing production-based vehicles as well as production-based technologies,” Jamie Allison, director, Ford Racing, said. “We’re proud to bring a direct-injected, twin-turbo 3.5-liter V6 EcoBoost engine to the United SportsCar Championship in a field of competitive V8-powered entries. We want to show Ford EcoBoost’s capabilities as an engine that provides both performance and fuel economy, on and off the track.”

“This engine is the future,” says Doug Yates, CEO, Roush Yates Racing Engines. “This Ford EcoBoost engine includes all the newest technologies – direct injection, turbocharging and high efficiency. We’re looking at taking it to the next level through this sports car racing program.”

To see the Daytona Prototype car, powered by the all-new EcoBoost 3.5-liter V6, take on its first race, be sure to check-out the 2014 Rolex 24 at Daytona Jan. 25-26. If you can’t get time for that first race, the car will be a part of the entire 12-race season.

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26 comments
Craig Even
Craig Even

Better get used to it next gen is gonna make more with less ! What all the makers are doing right now is fantastic ! This stuff will never sound as good as good ole v8 !

Ron Wikstrom
Ron Wikstrom

YES JOE! Finally, someone! More cylinders don't mean a better engine. There are plenty of small forced induction 4cyl making same power as a big 8 cyl power plant, 318 at the very least

William Violett
William Violett

It's not necessarily about what kind, how big, how many cylinders. It's the technology that is coming out, faster computers, better materials, better engineering. If they didn't think they could win with that engine then they need to start paying some different engineers.

Joe Dooley
Joe Dooley

In basic terms, the efficiency rating is the amount of air entering the chambers vs how much air the engine can actually turn into power. Intake manifold runners, port size, cam lift/duration (how long the intake and exhaust valves stay open under throttle) This is why "porting" or "smoothing/polishing" produces power gains; the bigger the port the more air an engine can breath in and use to burn more fuel which gives you more power. Today's new, modernized engines are a world above what used to be the "norm" due to computer controlled variable valve event timing, secondary intake runners to maximize low and high RPM torque, etc. A perfect example of this would be comparing an older Honda to an older Ford or Chevy V6-V8. A stock B18C can make well over 200hp while being internally stock at a displacement of only 1.8 L, whereas a Ford 3.8, Chevy 3.4/3.8 etc of the same era all make under 175hp despite being nearly twice the size as the Honda. Restrictive induction components are responsible for every performance car dud ever made. Early 80's Pontiac big blocks-455 CID making 225hp, early and mid 80s 289/302 CID Ford small blocks- 190-210hp, late 80s - early 90's 454 big block Chevys- 240hp. the list goes on. Fast forward to 2013, and you get small displacement DOHC engines efficient enough to make 1000+ hp with boost and a relatively stock engine.

Joe Dooley
Joe Dooley

More important than displacement/ size is an engines overall volumetric efficiency. All internal combustion engines are nothing more than a big air pump. Larger displacement engines have the POTENTIAL to make more power than a smaller counterpart, but the deciding factor always comes from a volumetric efficiency at or near 100%.

Jacob Salmonson
Jacob Salmonson

Can we have some interchangeability again and less plastic stuff and one year only design, who wants to buy a throwaway car...

Steve Roscarel
Steve Roscarel

I love the technology in this engine. The future is here!

Tom Ringlein
Tom Ringlein

Yes it is the future of hot rodding - for sure. Not for a long f*&%ing time, but certainly in the future.

Grant Graves
Grant Graves

Matt Watson I believe it was you and I talking about this the other day.

Joe Willman
Joe Willman

Haha, Brian said "daily driven" 7 second rockets... nope. That's full race. You're luck to break 9s with a daily 1.my ass liter motor that's a daily driver. Street legal, sure. But not a daily. What a joke.

Joe Willman
Joe Willman

Forced induction, yes. But let's keep it above 282 cubes, K?

Lee Henderson
Lee Henderson

I wish they would just "Ecoboost" the Coyote 5.0 already...that 3.5L sounds like ass loud and a minivan quiet. I am 100% certain the mpgs would be the same...if not better.

Skylar Drake
Skylar Drake

Well it's not a replacement, I like to call it an alternative. It works on the same principle that any power adder does, more air, more fire, more power. You're just tricking the engine into thinking it is larger cubic inch. Same thing as sticking huge cylinder heads on a sbc, the heads will shove more air then the engine can technically handle, and when you throw a little spray to it it tricks the engine into thinking its much larger cubic inch then it is. As for fuel mileage, the main factor is weight, second to that is power under load. If you had an all aluminum 454 then sure it could get excellent fuel mileage due to low rotating weight, and the fact that it makes more horsepower then is necessary, so you cut back fuel usage saving gas.

Craig Hambright
Craig Hambright

Ferrari and Lamborghini have done it for decades, so its about damn time they applied that technology here!

Edward Lee
Edward Lee

Technically, boost is the replacement for displacement. It's compressing and feeding more air into the engine, just like a bigger displacement engine would be doing. Problem is, I know for a fact I can afford the gas on a smaller displacement engine that is boosted but not a bigger engine, let alone it being boosted... If you can afford to boost a 454 and actually drive it often, then all to you. You'll have an insanely fast car.

Scotty Thornton Ipalook
Scotty Thornton Ipalook

Some say there's no replacement for displacement, others say that there is, and that it's boost. To all the rice rocket racers, what if I put a turbo on a 454, or something of that nature? Then what?

Randy Young
Randy Young

Probably. But a LARGE forced induction engine will always make more power than a SMALL forced induction engine!

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